Crops and Livestock

EVENTS

2017 Green Lands Blue Waters Conference

Date: November 28-29, 2017
Location: UW-Madison Pyle Center
details

Midwest CSA Conference

Date: December 7-8, 2017
Location: Wisconsin Dells, WI
details

Wisconsin Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Conference

Date: January 21-23, 2018
Location: Kalahari Resort, Wisconsin Dells, WI
details

more events

SUCCESS STORIES

The Wisconsin School for Beginning Dairy and Livestock Farmers: Keeping the Dream of Farming Alive

As older farmers retire, fewer young farmers are stepping in to take their place. The number of beginning farmers dropped 20 percent in the last five-year census period, and the average US farmer now tops 58 years of age. more

CIAS Mini-Grants Support Graduate Student Research in Sustainable Agriculture

CIAS supports innovative graduate student research addressing the challenges faced by small- and medium-sized farms and food businesses. Awarded annually, our competitive mini-grants aid students as they initiate their research in sustainable agriculture and food systems. more



Eco-Fruit Project Update

The Wisconsin Apple Growers Association, four grower networks, one consultant, NRCS and UW researchers are working with CIAS to develop a production approach that reduces grower reliance on high-risk pesticides. These older pesticides, particularly Guthion and Imidan, are targeted for phase-out and reduction, respectively, as the EPA administers the federal Food Quality Protection Act. In […] more

Fruit with Potential for Wisconsin Farms

Carandale farm in Oregon, Wisconsin tested 99 cultivars of 34 unique fruit crop species during the 2003-2004 growing seasons. These fruit varieties are being evaluated for horticultural suitability and marketing potential. Several fruit crops are emerging as having high potential for economic and environmental sustainability. The top five promising plants include European Black Currants, Aronia, […] more

Overview of Organic Cranberry Production

Organic cranberries are produced across the continent, with over 100 acres grown in Wisconsin. The major problems facing organic cranberry growers include weeds, insect pests, fruit rot and other fruit quality issues; but most significant is a 50% or more reduction in yield compared to conventional production. There is room for the organic cranberry market […] more

Stories From the Field: Environmental Research at the University of Wisconsin

CIAS and Wisconsin Public Television have produced a series of educational videos on sustainable agriculture and IPM for potatoes, apples, and fresh market vegetables. These videos can be viewed online at the Research Channel: Healthy Grown Potatoes Fresh Market Fruit and Vegetables, Part 1 Fresh Market Fruit and Vegetables, Part 2 more

Beneficial insect habitat in an apple orchard: Effects on pests (Research Brief #71)

Printer-friendly version (PDF) Apple orchards attract many kinds of insects that damage vegetation and fruit. But these orchard pests have insect enemies of their own. Growers can provide habitat for these natural enemies, also known as beneficial insects, as part of an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy that reduces the need for pesticides. more

Integrated Pest Management: An Overview for Market Growers

Chemicals are not the only, or often the best, option for controlling pest problems. Integrated Pest Management is an alternative that uses all appropriate pest management methods instead of focusing on a single method. This will often prevent some pest problems from developing in the first place and will reduce the severity of others. This […] more

Integrated Weed Management for Fresh Market Production

In fruit and vegetable production, more labor is often spent on weed management than any other task. Understanding where a weed grows, why it grows in a particular place, and what actions will limit its growth are important parts of a weed control strategy. This publication will guide you through the establishment of a successful […] more

Fresh market growers share pest management strategies (Research Brief #62)

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) combines monitoring practices with cultural, physical, and biological control strategies to manage pests with a minimum of pesticides. With support from the Pesticide Use and Risk Reduction Project at CIAS, UW-Madison rural sociologist Pete Nowak and Extension IPM specialist Karen Delahaut surveyed Wisconsin fresh market vegetable and berry growers in 2001. They found that many fresh market vegetable and berry growers in Wisconsin use IPM practices. more
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