Crops and Livestock

EVENTS

Food and the Wisconsin Idea

Date: September 20, 2017, 3-5pm
Location: Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery, UW-Madison
details

CIAS Harvest Dinner 2017

Date: October 29, 2017, 5:30pm
Location: University Club, UW-Madison
details

Edible Startup Summit

Date: November 17-18, 2017
Location: American Family Center, Madison, WI
details

more events

SUCCESS STORIES

The Wisconsin School for Beginning Dairy and Livestock Farmers: Keeping the Dream of Farming Alive

As older farmers retire, fewer young farmers are stepping in to take their place. The number of beginning farmers dropped 20 percent in the last five-year census period, and the average US farmer now tops 58 years of age. more

CIAS Mini-Grants Support Graduate Student Research in Sustainable Agriculture

CIAS supports innovative graduate student research addressing the challenges faced by small- and medium-sized farms and food businesses. Awarded annually, our competitive mini-grants aid students as they initiate their research in sustainable agriculture and food systems. more



Echineacea as a tobacco crop alternative (Research Brief #48)

Many Wisconsin tobacco farmers are looking for alternative crops following the ongoing reductions in tobacco allotments and tobacco markets. Allotment reductions mean lower production levels and lower incomes for tobacco farmers. One crop proposed as an alternative to tobacco is echinacea (pronounced ek-in-a-sha), or purple coneflower, grown mainly for its medicinal root. Echinacea has enjoyed […] more

Echinacea as a Tobacco Crop Alternative

Tobacco farmers in Wisconsin have been losing base acreage and income in recent years. Because Echinacea and tobacco production share many similarities, Echinacea has been suggested as an alternative crop for tobacco farmers. Making $3,766 per acre with Angustifolia Echinacea looks better than any corn or soybean budget. But there are risks to consider, mainly […] more

Traps help monitor pine root weevil in Christmas trees (Research Brief #5)

An easy-to-use trap may allow Wisconsin Christmas tree growers in the future to market healthy trees with less insecticide. Developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison entomologists, the traps currently are enabling researchers to monitor the pine root weevil. The insect can inflict heavy damage on Christmas trees and requires a lot of insecticide to control. Monitoring […] more
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